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Application Note: Molecular Beacon Probe Fluorescent Detection of DNA

Molecular beacon probes are a sequence of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA and RNA) that can be used to fluorescently detect the presence of a specific sequence of DNA or RNA. With real-world examples as PCR quantification, in vivo RNA detection, pathogen detection and viral load quantification. The use of molecular beacons, coupled with a sensitive spectrofluorometer facilitates the measurement of extremely low concentrations of DNA or RNA. In this application note, nanomolar concentrations of cDNA were quantified using a molecular beacon while controlling the temperature of incubation and measuring the sample emission with an Edinburgh Instruments FS5 Spectrofluorometer.


Application Note: Measuring Ethanol Content in Hand Sanitiser Using Raman Spectroscopy

Hand sanitiser needs to >60% ethanol to be effective at killing microbes on your hands. This Application Note details how Raman spectroscopy can be used to create ethanol calibration curves providing a rapid method for ensuring hand sanitisers meet the 60% requirement.


Application Note: Relative Quantum Yield of 2-Aminopyridine

Quantum yield is a fundamental photophysical parameter that describes a sample's fluorescence efficiency, and it can be measured optically via the absolute method and relative method. 2-Aminopyridine (2AMP) in sulfuric acid (H2SO4) has been previously used as a quantum yield reference standard in the UV-visible range. However, the 2AMP quantum yield values are now decades old. In this application note, we present a reinvestigation and revaluation of the quantum yield of 2AMP in 1M H2SO4, using quinine bisulphate (QBS) in 1M H2SO4 as the reference standard with an Edinburgh Instruments FS5 Spectrofluorometer.


Application Note: Sb to Mn Energy Transfer Revealed using Time-Resolved Emission Spectroscopy

Heterometallic metal halide hybrids hold great promise due to the potential for synergistic photo-physical properties depending on the choice of the constituent metal centres. In this application note time-resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) with the FLS1000 Photoluminescence Spectrometer is used to identify the emission pathways in the 0D metal halide hybrid, Tris SbMnCl.


Application Note: Comparing Hole Extraction Efficiencies in Perovskite Solar Cells using Photoluminescence Quantum Yield

Efficient extraction of charge carriers is critical for the creation of high-efficiency solar cells. Photoluminescence is proportional to the number of charge carriers in the perovskite and therefore sensitive to charge transfer into adjacent layers which makes photoluminescence based techniques invaluable for investigating the performance of new extraction layers. In this application note, the extraction efficiency of a VACNT hole extraction layer is investigated using PL spectroscopy with an Edinburgh Instruments FLS1000 Photoluminescence Spectrometer.


Application Note: Terahertz Molecular Lasers - Introduction & Applications

The terahertz spectral region, which falls between the microwave and infrared ranges, is one of the most promising regions of the electromagnetic spectrum for research and industry but it is currently underutilised in these areas. One of the most versatile sources for spectroscopy and imaging research in this region, is the Molecular Terahertz Laser. Find out how these lasers work and their applications in industrial and scientific imaging, materials analysis and biomedical research in this application note.


Application Note: 3D Raman Mapping of a Transdermal Patch

How can Raman microscopy help the battle to quit smoking? Read this latest application note to find out how the RMS1000 can aid pharmaceutical laboratories quality control nicotine patches via 3D Raman mapping.


Application Note: Energy Transfer in a Liquid Scintillator Investigated using Time-Resolved X-ray Excited Luminescence Spectroscopy

Liquid scintillator detectors are widely utilised in neutrino and astroparticle detection experiments. One liquid scintillator that is increasingly being used in large scale detection experiments is linear alkylbenzene (LAB). LAB is an attractive scintillator due to its low cost, high flash point and low toxicity; making it easier to handle than previously used toxic and flammable organic solvents. LAB is commonly used together with the fluor 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) which increases luminescence yield and shifts the luminescence to longer wavelengths.In this application note the properties of the liquid scintillator system LAB/PPO are investigated using time-resolved X-ray excited luminescence spectroscopy with the FLS1000 and XS1 X-ray Sample Chamber.


Application Note: Confocal Raman and Photoluminescence Microscopy for Forensic Investigations

Forensic investigations often study extremely small samples which may need analysed by multiple techniques. Confocal Raman and Photoluminescence (PL) Microscopy are well-suited techniques for dealing with such samples. This application note details how Raman and PL microscopy can be used as an analysis tool in any forensic laboratory.


Application Note: Imaging Charge Extraction in VACNT Perovskite Solar Cells using Spectral and Lifetime Confocal Photoluminescence Mapping

In this application note, the hole transfer into a VACNT based hole extraction layer is imaged using steady-state and time-resolved confocal PL microscopy with an Edinburgh Instruments RMS1000 Confocal Raman & PL Microscope.