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Application Note: Multiphoton Imaging of Mouse Intestine

In this application note, an RMS1000 Confocal Microscope is used to image a tissue section of mouse intestine using two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy.


Application Note: Rapid Excitation Emission Matrix Analysis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique electrical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties which make them attractive for a wide variety of applications; ranging from drug delivery to battery electrodes. In this application note the FLS1000 Photoluminescence Spectrometer equipped with an InGaAs NIR camera is used to identify the chiral indexes present in a SWCNT sample using excitation emission matrix spectroscopy.


Application Note: Whisky Analysis by Raman Spectroscopy

Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique which can be used both quantitatively and qualitatively. This application note details the quantitative use of Raman spectroscopy to determine ethanol content in samples of whisky. Qualitatively, Raman spectroscopy can also be used for whisky analysis to ensure it does not contain methanol, a toxic alcohol which can be fraudulently used in alcohol sales to boost profits.


Application Note: Molecular Beacon Probe Fluorescent Detection of DNA

Molecular beacon probes are a sequence of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA and RNA) that can be used to fluorescently detect the presence of a specific sequence of DNA or RNA. With real-world examples as PCR quantification, in vivo RNA detection, pathogen detection and viral load quantification. The use of molecular beacons, coupled with a sensitive spectrofluorometer facilitates the measurement of extremely low concentrations of DNA or RNA. In this application note, nanomolar concentrations of cDNA were quantified using a molecular beacon while controlling the temperature of incubation and measuring the sample emission with an Edinburgh Instruments FS5 Spectrofluorometer.


Application Note: Measuring Ethanol Content in Hand Sanitiser Using Raman Spectroscopy

Hand sanitiser needs to >60% ethanol to be effective at killing microbes on your hands. This Application Note details how Raman spectroscopy can be used to create ethanol calibration curves providing a rapid method for ensuring hand sanitisers meet the 60% requirement.


Application Note: Relative Quantum Yield of 2-Aminopyridine

Quantum yield is a fundamental photophysical parameter that describes a sample's fluorescence efficiency, and it can be measured optically via the absolute method and relative method. 2-Aminopyridine (2AMP) in sulfuric acid (H2SO4) has been previously used as a quantum yield reference standard in the UV-visible range. However, the 2AMP quantum yield values are now decades old. In this application note, we present a reinvestigation and revaluation of the quantum yield of 2AMP in 1M H2SO4, using quinine bisulphate (QBS) in 1M H2SO4 as the reference standard with an Edinburgh Instruments FS5 Spectrofluorometer.


Application Note: Imaging Charge Extraction in VACNT Perovskite Solar Cells using Spectral and Lifetime Confocal Photoluminescence Mapping

In this application note, the hole transfer into a VACNT based hole extraction layer is imaged using steady-state and time-resolved confocal PL microscopy with an Edinburgh Instruments RMS1000 Confocal Raman & PL Microscope.


Application Note: Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Phosphorescent Oxygen Sensors in a Relevant in vitro Environment for Biomedical Applications

This customer written application note details how researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory have outfitted an Edinburgh Instruments FLS1000 Photoluminescence Spectrometer to assess candidate dissolved oxygen sensors.


Application Note: Gemstone Identification Using Raman Microscopy

The gemstone industry suffers massively from forgeries that even highly experienced jewellers cannot determine. Read this application note to discover how Raman microscopy offers itself as a useful technique in the identification of gemstones.


Application Note: Raman Microscopy of Graphene

Graphene is the thinnest material known to exist, whilst also being extremely strong - around 200 times stronger than steel. Graphene is an excellent conductor of electricity and heat as it is optically transparent. The applications of graphene are extensive, and include energy storage, photodetectors, and computer chips. In this application note we highlight how Raman microscopy is an essential tool for any material scientist researching graphene.