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Spectral Resolution in Raman Spectroscopy

The spectral resolution in Raman spectroscopy dictates the maximum number of spectral peaks that the spectrometer can resolve. The level of spectral resolution required is dependent on the sample and what information the user is aiming to obtain from the Raman spectrum. Five main factors determine the spectral resolution achievable: slit size, diffraction grating, spectrometer focal length, detector, and the

Role of the Pinhole in a Confocal Microscope

The pinhole is the defining feature of a Confocal Raman Microscope, providing major advantages in spatial resolution and imaging contrast over a conventional optical microscope. In this article we take a look at the role of the pinhole in a Confocal Raman Microscope.

Spatial Resolution in Raman Spectroscopy

Achieving high spatial resolution in Raman microscopy is crucial for high quality Raman maps. This article details the main factors contributing to lateral and axial resolution.

Edinburgh Instruments Asian Webinars - July 2020

We are delighted to announce a series of Webinars this Summer by our Taiwan business partners, Rightek. For those working in the field of molecular spectroscopy research, the webinars will feature a series of talks given by some of the industry’s leading names, talks by Edinburgh Instruments Application Scientists covering some of their recent research and software and hardware overviews of

What is Confocal Raman Microscopy?

Combining the spectral information from Raman spectroscopy with the spatial filtering of a confocal optical microscope for high-resolution chemical imaging of samples, find out more about Confocal Raman Microscopy.

Edinburgh Instruments June 2020 Webinar Series

We are delighted to announce that we will be running a series of webinars in June covering molecular spectroscopy applications. The webinars are open to anyone interested in expanding their knowledge on current research topics and trends in fluorescence, Raman and transient absorption spectroscopy. Browse the series and register your interest.

What is Laser Induced Fluorescence?

Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is an optical spectroscopic technique where a sample is excited with a laser, and the fluorescence emitted by the sample is subsequently captured by a photodetector. LIF can be understood as a class of fluorescence spectroscopy where the usual lamp excitation is replaced by a laser source. Find out more.

COVID-19 Disease Testing; Utilising Fluorescence During a Pandemic

While the world continues to endure loss and hardship due to the outbreak of COVID-19, caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), researchers are scrambling to provide test kits that are accurate, fast, sensitive, and widely available, especially as symptoms vary broadly and may not appear for days if at all. To this end, several diagnostic

What is Resonance Raman Spectroscopy?

Resonance Raman spectroscopy is a Raman enhancement technique in which the laser excitation frequency is chosen to be close to the frequency of an electronic transition of the sample. Resonance Raman can enhance the Raman scattering intensity by a factor of 102-106 and improves signal-to-noise. Find out more.

Customer Publication: Nanoparticle Composites for Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation

We were delighted to see the recent publication by Dr Stoichko Dimitrov, Lecturer in Chemistry at Queen Mary University of London, on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots/TiO2 Nanoparticle Composites for Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation.